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    Title: Hysteresis Hypothesis in Job Creation and Destruction: Evidence from the U.S
    Authors: Liu, De-Chih
    Contributors: 淡江大學產業經濟學系
    Keywords: Hysteresis hypothesis;Job creation;Job destruction
    Date: 2011-11
    Issue Date: 2013-05-29 11:38:13 (UTC+8)
    Publisher: Beijing: Peking University Press
    Abstract: We employ the Im et al. (2005) and the Bai and Carrion-i-Silvestre (2009) tests of panel based unit root types to investigate the hysteresis hypothesis in job creation and destruction using U.S. state-level data. Although the conventional individual unit tests fail to reject the unit root for some of the states job creation and destruction rates, the results based on two panel-based unit root tests indicate that the hysteresis hypothesis in job creation and destruction can clearly be rejected. Our findings suggest that given sufficient time, the job creation and destruction rates will return to their previous paths.
    Relation: Annals of Economics and Finance 12(2), pp.389-409
    Appears in Collections:[Graduate Institute & Department of Industrial Economics] Journal Article

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