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    Title: 日治時代における台湾の神社政策 : その国民統合の役割を中心として
    Other Titles: 日治時代台灣的神社政策 : 以其在國民統合中扮演之角色為中心
    Shinto shrine policy in Taiwan in Japanese colonial period : the role in uniting people
    日治時代臺灣的神社政策 : 以其在國民統合中扮演之角色為中心
    Authors: 賴麗蓮;Lai, Li-lien
    Contributors: 淡江大學日本研究所碩士班
    劉長輝;Liou, Charng-huei
    Keywords: 日據時代;神社政策;殖民地;國民統合;宗教;Japanese colonial period;Shinto shrine policy;colony;the unity of the people;religion;日本統治時代;神社政策;植民地;国民統合;宗教
    Date: 2006
    Issue Date: 2010-01-10 23:51:48 (UTC+8)
    Abstract: 本論文的主要研究課題為日治時代台灣的神社政策與國民統合之關連,並進而探討其在國民統合上扮演之角色。
    明治政府在各殖民地建立神社,並強制要求殖民地人民進行參拜。此強制神社參拜,是為了使殖民地人民認同以天皇為中心的「共同意識」而進行的滲透行動。因此,達成政治動員可說是其最大的目的所在。
    但在日本據台初期,即使台灣神社創建後亦沒有為了宣傳神道思想而強制人民參拜。其原因是,在據台初期尚未受到認同的階段,若強行要求殖民地人民放棄固有的信仰與宗教恐怕將引起反對聲浪。而在中日戰爭爆發後,一直以來的懷柔政策一轉而為激烈的皇民化運動。不但固有宗教遭到壓制,民眾的生活也被迫必須轉變。然而被迫改變信仰與生活的台灣人民對此亦產生極大反感。
    日治時期,即使台灣總督府在神社的建立、參拜與勞動作業上投注莫大心力,亦無法使台灣人民對神社產生敬意的原因,除了其對於固有宗教的深切信仰以外,對「神」概念的迥異亦是一大因素。國家神道是以國家權力及統治階層的力量為背景而發展的,其本身就是國民統合的象徵而帶有日本共同體的性格。但,如此強制性的信仰理所當然不被人民所接受。正廳改善運動時,將台灣人祖先牌位強制改成日本樣式、或是將其燒毀,以及毀棄固有宗教的神佛像等的真實型態即是最好的說明。
    而不但這樣包含政治目的的宗教不被台灣人民所認同,象徵殖民統治的神社同樣也無法得到台灣人民的尊重。於是,日本政府欲以象徵神道的神社來達到促進國民統合的的企圖,最終當然也無法實現。
    The research task of this thesis is the connection between the Shinto shrine policy and the unity of the people in Taiwan in Japanese colonial period, and further proceeds to research the role of Shinto shrine policy in uniting people.
    The Meiji government not only established the Shinto shrines in every colony, but also forced the colonials to worship and have faith in it. This is an infiltration that is for urging the colonials to agree with Tenno system. In other words, the ultimate goal of carrying out Shinto shrine policy is to accomplish Japanese’ political purpose, namely governance.
    In the beginning of Japanese colonial period, the government-general didn’t force the colonials to worship the Taiwan Shrine after establishing it. That is because it would arouse public indignation if government-general forced the colonials to give up their original religion before being accepted by the colonials. However, in order to continuously proceed with the Kominka movement, the government became more radical to carry out the Shinto shrine policy after the Sino‐Japanese war. Thereafter, the conventional religions were controlled, and the colonials were forced to change their life styles as well. As a result, the colonials were outraged by the government’s actions.
    Two reasons that no matter how much the government-general in Taiwan endeavored to establish the shrines, or force the colonials to worship and serve the shrines, the Shinto shrines still couldn’t be respected at that time are the colonials had their deep faith in the conventional religions and the different concepts of god between the colonials and the government. The national Shinto is originally the symbol of the unity of the people, because it developed under the state power. That’s also the reason why it can’t be accepted by colonies. The Seichyo-Kaizen movement is a good illustration of it.
    In short, that is why such a religion which is full with political purpose could not be accepted, and the intention that government wants to achieve by shrines would fail eventually.
    Appears in Collections:[日本研究所] 學位論文

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