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    Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://tkuir.lib.tku.edu.tw:8080/dspace/handle/987654321/24320


    Title: Obesity, Schooling and Health Knowledge: An Empirical Study of Taiwanese Women
    Authors: 鄒孟文;Tsou, Meng-wen;Liu, Jin-tan
    Contributors: 淡江大學國際貿易學系暨國際企業研究所
    Keywords: Schooling;health knowledge;obesity;body weight perceptions
    Date: 2006-03-01
    Issue Date: 2009-11-30 18:16:33 (UTC+8)
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Abstract: This paper sets out to examine the impacts of schooling and health knowledge on the level of obesity in Taiwan. The results obtained from a sample of Taiwanese females support the hypothesis of Grossman that schooling has a direct positive effect on health by reducing the likelihood of a person being obese. The awareness of obesity–disease relationships and the intake of fiber are negatively associated with obesity; however, the observed schooling–obesity correlation cannot be attributed solely to any differences existing between the health knowledge and awareness of different individuals. Furthermore, in common with the developed nations, the stigma attached to the obesity of women is also found to be widespread within Taiwanese society.
    Relation: Education economics 14(1), pp.89-106
    DOI: 10.1080/09645290500481915
    Appears in Collections:[國際企業學系暨研究所] 期刊論文

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